LinkedIn’s Open Candidates feature allows you to share the specifics of your career goals – types of companies, roles you’re seeking, etc. – with executive recruiters who may be able to help you meet those goals.

LinkedIn explains Open Candidates in the Help pages:

“Once you opt to share your career goals with recruiters, users of LinkedIn’s Recruiter product will be able to find you based on your shared career interests when they are searching for profiles.”

Sounds like a great way to put yourself front and center with recruiters in your niche.

But wait . . .

Once you open the Open Candidates page on your profile, LinkedIn says:

“We take steps to not show your current company that you’re open, but can’t guarantee that we can identify every recruiter affiliated with your company.”

Sounds like this feature is not a wise choice for those job-hunting undercover. If you can’t risk anyone finding out that you’re job hunting, maybe you should steer clear of this one.

But, if you’re among the minority of executive job seekers who can be wide open about your search, Open Candidates may make sense . . . and may boost your chances of connecting with the right recruiters.

In a Mashable article, Dan Shapero, director of product management for LinkedIn Careers, says early testing has shown that:

“So-called ‘open candidates’ are more likely to be contacted by recruiters and recruiters are more likely to hear back from them.”

With LinkedIn’s new 2016/2017 User Interface, access Open Candidates by clicking on “Jobs” in the menu at the top of your profile. Look for the “Update preferences” link.

Executive Job Search and Personal Branding Help

Land a GREAT-FIT New Executive GigNeed help with personal branding, your LinkedIn profile, resume and biography, and getting your executive job search on track . . . to land a great-fit new gig?

Take a look at the services I offer, how my process works and what differentiates my value-offer . . . then get in touch with me and we’ll get the ball rolling.

More About Executive Job Search

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5 Must-Do’s To Land More Executive Job Interviews

by Meg Guiseppi on February 20, 2017

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When you’re in executive job search mode, landing a coveted interview is like hitting the jackpot.

Sometimes you’re lucky, and job interviews come easily, despite your lack of focused and concerted effort.

Most of the time, it takes planning, preparation and a lot of work to position yourself for the interviews you want.

Before describing the must-do’s . . .

2 Important Executive Job Search Caveats

1. Don’t spend a lot of time responding to job postings.

Only a very small percent of executive job seekers land jobs through job boards, especially at the c-suite and senior executive level. Your time is much better spent working the methods that yield better results, as described below. But job boards are great places for company, market and industry research.

2. Don’t rely entirely on executive recruiters to get you into your next gig.

They are a source for jobs, of course, but getting in touch with a few recruiters and waiting for them to find good-fit jobs for you could make for a prolonged job search. You’ll need to be much more proactive to land interviews.

5 Must-Do Ways to Land More Job Interviews

1. Target specific companies and research their current pressing needs that you’re uniquely qualified to help them meet.

Determine what qualities and qualifications will make you a good fit for specific employers. Narrowing your job search, as much as you can, works better than having a vague job search goal.

2. Define and differentiate your personal brand around what makes you a good fit for those target employers.

With this information and your targeting and research work in #1, you’ll be much better able to communicate – verbally and on paper – what makes you valuable, and position yourself as someone of interest.

3. Balance personal branding (soft skills) with Personal SEO (hard skills or areas of expertise) to:

  • Build online visibility in your LinkedIn profile (and elsewhere online),
  • Be found by executive recruiters and other hiring managers, and
  • Provide social proof to support the claims you’ve made in your job search documents (resume, biography, etc.)

4. Network your way into “hidden jobs” at your target companies.

Hidden jobs are those that are never advertised, so you will never find them on job boards.

Reach out to employees there and ask them for informational interviews, to find out more about their companies. These are not job interviews, where you send them your resume and ask for a job, but they should lead to actual job interviews. Many companies have Employee Referral Programs (ERP) to reward their employees who recommend good hires.

5. Stay top-of-mind with your network.

One important way to stay top-of-mind is to leverage LinkedIn with the following tools. Your network will be more likely to remember you when good-fit opportunities for you come their way:

  • Publishing articles on the Pulse platform to demonstrate your subject matter expertise and thought leadership.
  • Sharing relevant updates from your profile Home page.
    Participating regularly in LinkedIn Groups.
  • Commenting on, and liking, other people’s postings in the above 3 places.
  • Surprising a colleague, vendor or others in your network with a LinkedIn recommendation.

Executive Job Search and Personal Branding Help

Land a GREAT-FIT New Executive GigNeed help with personal branding, your LinkedIn profile, resume and biography, and getting your executive job search on track . . . to land a great-fit new gig?

Take a look at the services I offer, how my process works and what differentiates my value-offer . . . then get in touch with me and we’ll get the ball rolling.

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How to Land, Brand and Ace Executive Job Interviews

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The Personal Branding Manifesto for Executive Job Search Part – 4

by Meg Guiseppi February 13, 2017

Two Little-Known Ways to Master The Personal Branding Social Proof Paradigm   Check out the first three parts in this series: Part 1 – What Personal Branding Is and Is NOT, and How Personal Branding Makes You Stand Out Part 2 – How to Define Your Unique Personal Brand and Make It Memorable Part 3 […]

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Oh, How the New LinkedIn Has Changed!

by Meg Guiseppi February 6, 2017

    I just completed updating my 3 executive job search ebooks. Most of the strategies I recommend in them haven’t changed much over the past year but, as I got into LinkedIn particulars, I quickly realized that my content updates were going to take a lot longer than I anticipated. LinkedIn, like all social media, […]

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Executive Job Search Advice From the Experts

by Meg Guiseppi January 31, 2017

  I’m very flattered and grateful to be included among such heavy hitters in Career Sherpa’s (Hannah Morgan) “50+ Best Websites For Job Search 2017“. WOW! What a valuable resource this list is! Hannah is a nationally recognized author and speaker on all things job search, with a weekly column in U.S. News & World […]

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The Personal Branding Manifesto for Executive Job Search – Part 3

by Meg Guiseppi January 30, 2017

Mind Your Online Reputation: The Personal Branding Social Proof Paradigm   Check out the first two parts in this series: Part 1 – What Personal Branding Is and Is NOT, and How Personal Branding Makes You Stand Out Part 2 – How to Define Your Unique Personal Brand and Make It Memorable Here is an […]

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