2010 Top 10 Executive Personal Branding and Job Search Trends

by Meg Guiseppi on December 22, 2009

direction[1]Things have changed in the world of work and executive job search.

Tried and true methods still apply, but the impact of the Internet and our recovering job market require building a different kind of job search strategy and becoming much more proactive.

In a nutshell, what you need to do along with real-life networking, is embrace and leverage personal branding, social networking at sites like LinkedIn and Twitter, and social media, while building a strong, brand-evident online presence . . . or get left behind.

Your peers who finesse the new tactics already have a competitive advantage over people who don’t. They’re strategically positioned to accelerate their job searches.

Here’s how things are stacking up for executive job search in 2010 – some new rules, some old rules:

1. Be flexible.

Don’t assume that your next job will be a full-time position with one company. Temp to perm and portfolio careers (a mix of part-time employment, temporary jobs, freelancing, interim consulting, self-employment), especially for boomer executives, have become viable strategies.

Creating income security, instead of job security, is the new wave.

2. Get clear on what job you seek and target the companies where you’ll find it.

Frame your entire job search strategy around your target audience so that everything you put out there will resonate with them. Realize that in job search, you’re in the middle of a sales and marketing campaign for your company (i.e., YOU) in which you’re pitching your value proposition.

Keep an eye on market trends and opportunities. Dig into targeted industry and company research for due diligence, market intelligence, and to position yourself as an informed, engaged candidate in interviews.

Compile a list of at least 10 companies that will fulfill your needs and the key decision makers within each one.

Google the decision makers’ names to find out where they hang out online and offline and how you can connect with them. Here’s your chance to circumvent the gatekeepers by identifying and connecting directly with top decision makers and tap into the hidden job market of unadvertised positions and possible newly created opportunities tailor-made for you.

In your research, learn about the culture of each company, and determine what their issues and problems are so you can develop your pitch around their needs.

Set up Google Alerts to have Google email you up-to-the-minute news on your industry plus companies, people, and relevant keywords of your choice. See my Job-Hunt article, Power Your Personal Brand Using Google Alerts.

More details in my post How to Target and Network into Hidden C-Level Executive Jobs.

3. Define your personal brand and amplify it in your personal marketing communications.

brand-youPersonal branding is all about defining the unique set of strengths, personal attributes, passions, and drivers that differentiate you from your peers, aligned to resonate with your target audience.

Branding generates chemistry and makes it easier for recruiters and hiring decision makers to visualize you at work making things happen. It helps them determine whether you’re a good fit for their organization and whether to hire you or do business with you.

And because the brand development process identifies your vision, purpose, values and passions, it also helps invigorate you and gain a keener understanding of what kind of work is a best fit for you. Branding helps you position yourself to move toward career fulfillment and to work your passion.

Expect the process of defining your executive brand to take some time, so get started on it. For more specifics, see my post The Executive Personal Brand Worksheet: 10 Steps to an Authentic, Magnetic Personal Brand.

And to dispel the misinformation you may be hearing and reading about personal branding, read my post What Personal Branding is NOT.

Once you’ve defined your brand, design your paper/digital executive resume, career biography and other personal marketing documents to resonate with your target audience.

Just as the executive job search landscape has changed, so have these documents. They don’t read and look the way they used to, based in large part on the fact that more and more hiring professionals will be reviewing your digital documents on their PDAs or netbooks (think tiny screens).

Make their job easier and entice them to scroll down through the whole document by writing concise statements of value (no more than 3 or 4 lines) surrounded by enough white space for each one to stand out. Tightly packed dense information doesn’t attract the reader well.

Pay special attention to what lands above the fold or on the top of the screen. This prime real estate can make or break your chance to be considered. Since many hiring professionals have limited time and may read no further, assume that this part of your resume should stand on its own to showcase your value proposition.

Remember that these are marketing documents, not career histories. Include just enough information to capture attention and compel people to contact you. Precision writing and strategy are key – everything in these documents should align with what your target audience will be looking for in them – nothing included should be arbitrary.

See samples of executive resumes, career bios and other documents I’ve created for actual clients, to get an idea of how they should look and read.

4. Create a fully-fleshed out and searchable LinkedIn profile and develop a strategy.

LinkedInDid you know that recruiters and hiring decision makers use special applications to search LinkedIn for viable candidates?

Use your executive resume and some of your career bio as the foundation for your profile. As always, capture attention with what lands above the fold (in this case, whatever lands at the top of the screen).

Pack searchability and a powerful brand punch into your professional headline.

Make inroads connecting with your list of key decision makers within your companies of interest. Check their LinkedIn profiles and join the LI Groups they belong to.

You may be sitting on a lead right now that you haven’t leveraged. Make a list of everyone you know at work and in your personal life. See if they’re on LI and connect with them. Let them know what kind of job you want and who your target employers are.

Download my free e-book for more details, Executive Branding and Your LinkedIn Profile: How to Transform Your Executive Brand, Resume, and Career Biography Into a Winning LinkedIn Profile.

5. Get visible elsewhere online. Build a strong e-brand and brand equity.

Surveys show that the majority of recruiters and hiring decision makers search online when they’re sourcing and assessing top talent. See my post, Does Your Online Identity Scream “Hire Me”?

Design a far-reaching personal marketing strategy to consistently communicate your unique promise of value across multiple channels, online and offline.

Position yourself directly in front of your target key decision makers:

♦ Establish presence where they’re hanging out online searching for people like you.

♦ Get published online to showcase your subject matter expertise.

♦ Make sure you have plenty of brand-supporting search results on the first several pages of results when you Google “your name” and that absolutely no “digital dirt” exists related to your name. If it does, start building up positive results to push the bad ones further down.

It takes time to become “sticky” and build credibility and visibility online. If you have little or no brand-reinforcing presence online when you’re job-hunting, you’ll have a hard time catching up with your competition who have already worked on establishing themselves online.

Here are a few places to build presence online and increase the number of positive search results associated with you:

♦ Create a VisualCV to house your portfolio of your personal marketing documents.

♦ Create a Google Profile.

♦ Clean up your ZoomInfo profile, if one exists. Otherwise create a fully fleshed out one.

♦ Blog in some way – your own blog and/or guest blog and comment on other relevant blogs. Keep building up keyword-rich content so you’re more likely to be found when people search relevant topics. See my post, Executive Job Search and Blogging: Perfect Together.

♦ Create a key word-rich profile on Facebook and other social networking sites.

♦ Build a website using the domain “yourname.com”.

♦ Write book reviews on Amazon and other online book sellers.

♦ Publish articles and/or white papers online. Your professional affiliations and organizations would probably love to have you contribute content to their websites.

6. Don’t underestimate the strategic positioning value of Twitter.

twitterI know, I know. You’re probably skeptical. But hiring professionals leverage the networking power of Twitter to find leads. Since that’s where they are, that’s where you should be, too.

On Twitter you can get under the radar of recruiters, hiring decision makers, and industry thought leaders and subject matter experts. Identify the right people to connect with, follow them on Twitter, support them with frequent re-tweets, and position yourself as a person of interest.

Once you get active on Twitter, take advantage of the cross-branding power of LinkedIn’s Twitter application, which displays your most recent tweets on your LI profile and gives you instant access to the updates of people you follow on Twitter, along with the power to tweet, reply, and re-tweet from your LinkedIn home page.

See my post, Twitter Personal Branding Strategy — The Beauty of a Re-Tweet and my Best of Twitter for Personal Branding and Executive Job Search.

Take it further by getting active on other networking sites like Facebook, Ecademy, Plaxo, Ryze, etc.

7. Develop relationships with several executive recruiters who specialize in your industry and niche.

It takes time to build strategic relationships. Stay in touch with your circle of recruiters so you’ll be top of mind with them when a good fit comes their way.

Ask people in your network which recruiters they’ve worked with.

Buy Kennedy Information’s Directory of Executive Recruiters, the famous “Red Book” which lists over 10,000 recruiters at thousands of search firms, with all the contact information you need to start networking immediately with them.

See the Riley Guide’s short list of quality recruiters and how to work with them.

For advice on recruiting the recruiter, see my Interview with Executive Recruiter Jeff Lipschultz and his article for Job-Hunt.org, How Recruiters Pick YOU.

8. Don’t forget real-life networking.

If it’s been awhile since you’ve touched base with your network, circle back and re-connect with them. You may have more insights and support to offer them and they may have some fresh leads for you.

Reach out to former clients and vendors, professional associations, community groups and lifestyle groups. Check in with people and find out what they’re up to and update them on what you’ve been doing. Practice “give to get” networking and start building new mutually beneficial relationships.

Leverage the Internet employment portal Job-Hunt.org to connect or re-connect through professional associations & societies, and company, military & government alumni groups.

Check out Job-Hunt’s networking & job search support groups. Join these groups to share strategies, keep up with industry trends, and build mutually beneficial relationships.

9. Volunteer

volunteerVolunteering is a win-win strategy on so many levels. You’ll be helping others, but at the same time getting many benefits:

♦ Thinking about and helping others keeps you from feeling sorry for yourself and dwelling on how miserable you may be dealing with job search.

♦ Thrust yourself into terrific networking opportunities. This what “give to get” networking is all about.

♦ Develop and improve your networking skills, gain confidence in forming new relationships, and feel positive about yourself.

♦ Feel instant gratification. People are very kind to those who give of themselves and their time.

♦ Feel useful and needed by those who can truly use your help.

♦ Pump up your executive resume and bio. Meaningful volunteering makes for some powerful content to fuel your personal marketing communications.

♦ Uncover new career opportunities. You never know who you may be working shoulder to shoulder with, or who they’re talking to about you.

Some places and ways to volunteer:

  • Local non-profit/community outreach organizations and/or their Boards of Directors.
  • Job search support groups (once again, check out Job-Hunt’s networking & job search support groups).
  • Meetings and conventions of your professional organizations.
  • Church or religious affiliation activities.
  • PTA
  • Organizations like The Red Cross, Habitat For Humanity, United Way, The Salvation Army and many others.
  • Local companies fundraising efforts for non-profits.
  • For just about anything that interests you, there is a group that needs your help.

See my post, Volunteering Powers Up Your Personal Brand, Network, and C-Level Executive Job Search.

10. Keep your job search work/life equation in balance.

Take time every day, even if it’s only 10 or 15 minutes, for a mini-retreat from the noise. Step away from your email, voicemail, social networks, or any communications devices.

Take a walk, do a crossword puzzle, cook, read, meditate – whatever works for you. Getting away from the work of job search can help you find clarity.

Get a gym membership. This helps you establish a routine and gets you exercising, exhilarated, and feeling better about yourself.

If the stress of being unemployed and worrying about paying the bills is hitting you hard, download and read Leo Babauta’s free e-book Thriving on Less: Simplifying in a Tough Economy.

His advice will help you focus on the essentials, change your spending habits, and shoulder through.

And a bonus tip:

11. Try something different in your job search.

Stand out and capture attention by innovating a different approach. Zig when everyone else is zagging. To spur some new ideas, check out my post Resume Lingerie and 10 Other Guerrilla Job Search Strategies.

Related posts:

16 Deadly Executive Job Search Mistakes

5 Tactics to Land a Green Industry Executive Job

Stalled Executive Job Search? Get Busy on LinkedIn and Twitter

How to Build a Powerful Executive Network

{ 23 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Meg Guiseppi March 15, 2010 at 3:51 pm

Hi Lisa,

Thanks for commenting. Glad you found my post on point.

I appreciate your insights. I’m as guilty as the next person of neglecting real-life networking. We too often focus too much time on online efforts. My latest goal is to better balance the two.

Ciao!
Meg

2 LIsa Chandler March 14, 2010 at 10:17 am

Very comprehensive post. I am glad you included networking. I have been to a few social media things in the last few days and had dinner with one of Quebec’s best known bloggers, Martin Lessard, last night. I was asking all kinds of questions about what additional things I need to be doing online to build my coaching business and his answer was “come to Yulbiz” and he listed a few other networking events. As it turns out, Yulbiz is business networking for bloggers in Montreal but his point was made….face to face is alive and well and very IMPORTANT.

3 LIsa Chandler March 14, 2010 at 10:17 am

Very comprehensive post. I am glad you included networking. I have been to a few social media things in the last few days and had dinner with one of Quebec’s best known bloggers, Martin Lessard, last night. I was asking all kinds of questions about what additional things I need to be doing online to build my coaching business and his answer was “come to Yulbiz” and he listed a few other networking events. As it turns out, Yulbiz is business networking for bloggers in Montreal but his point was made….face to face is alive and well and very IMPORTANT.

4 Graduate Jobs February 12, 2010 at 4:45 am

This was such an interesting article.
Thanks for that. I will make a reference to it in my blog :)

5 Graduate Jobs February 12, 2010 at 4:45 am

This was such an interesting article.
Thanks for that. I will make a reference to it in my blog :)

6 Meg Guiseppi January 13, 2010 at 3:24 pm

Mike,

Thank you so much for your kind comments. I’m thrilled if my tips have helped you, and I hope others will heed them and get into their next great gigs faster.

Best,
Meg

7 Meg Guiseppi January 13, 2010 at 3:24 pm

Mike,

Thank you so much for your kind comments. I’m thrilled if my tips have helped you, and I hope others will heed them and get into their next great gigs faster.

Best,
Meg

8 Mike Ross January 13, 2010 at 1:05 pm

Meg,

Your message was packed with vital tips for the new year. Anyone following these recommendations will surely do better in their job searches this year. Thank you for the information and have a Happy New Year! Hope it will be your best one yet!

Mike Ross
St. Irenaeus Career Path Network Team
St. Andrew Career Mentoring Ministry Team

9 Meg Guiseppi January 11, 2010 at 6:33 am

Hi Doug!

Thanks so much for your kind comments and for RTing this post on Twitter. I appreciate your support!

Executive job search these days can be overwhelming and daunting to navigate. I’m thrilled if the advice in my post helps you and others get a handle on how to approach and run a successful search campaign.

Best,
Meg

10 Doug Lehman January 10, 2010 at 7:42 pm

Meg well thought post. Very good source of information that I will share with my network. I am trying to use many of your suggestions in my own personal branding search phase. Keep up the great work in the new year.

Doug Lehman – Atlanta
http://www.douglehman.com visual CV

11 Meg Guiseppi January 7, 2010 at 4:52 pm

Nancy,

Thank you. I appreciate your very kind comments. I’m glad you found my post of value.

Being clear on what we want is the first step in job search. How else can we determine who our target market is and align the best we have to offer with their needs.

-Meg

12 Nancy Baldwin January 7, 2010 at 4:13 pm

Meg:
Valuable and relevant information. Very throrough and up to date. The links you provide flesh out the basic content and create additonal food for thought. It is critically important that we communicate who we are and what we have to offer. Good information for small business owners as well as executives in transition.

Nancy Baldwin
Freelance Writer/Editor

13 Meg Guiseppi December 30, 2009 at 12:13 pm

Colleen,

Thanks very much for commenting and for the RT too! I’m glad my tips were of value.

Happy New Year!
Meg

14 Meg Guiseppi December 30, 2009 at 12:13 pm

Colleen,

Thanks very much for commenting and for the RT too! I’m glad my tips were of value.

Happy New Year!
Meg

15 Colleen December 30, 2009 at 11:28 am

Very thorough and detailed steps for moving on in a tough market!

16 Colleen December 30, 2009 at 11:28 am

Very thorough and detailed steps for moving on in a tough market!

17 Meg Guiseppi December 23, 2009 at 2:31 pm

Ralph, thanks for your kind comments.

It’s unfortunate that people have misconceptions about what branding actually is, and shy away from it. They’re missing out on the benefits. You’re lucky to have a handle on branding and what it can do for you.

-Meg

18 Meg Guiseppi December 23, 2009 at 2:31 pm

Ralph, thanks for your kind comments.

It’s unfortunate that people have misconceptions about what branding actually is, and shy away from it. They’re missing out on the benefits. You’re lucky to have a handle on branding and what it can do for you.

-Meg

19 Meg Guiseppi December 23, 2009 at 2:28 pm

Thanks for commenting, Mike. Have a great holiday!

20 Meg Guiseppi December 23, 2009 at 2:28 pm

Thanks for commenting, Mike. Have a great holiday!

21 Ralph Leon December 23, 2009 at 12:23 pm

Really enjoyed your article Meg. I think branding is really important, I think when people think brand the last thing they think about is themselves. I was lucky enough to have taken a branding class and was thinking to myself why don’t people do this more often. Whether its building awareness or making decisions easier branding is key. I think you did a great job with this list.

22 Ralph Leon December 23, 2009 at 12:23 pm

Really enjoyed your article Meg. I think branding is really important, I think when people think brand the last thing they think about is themselves. I was lucky enough to have taken a branding class and was thinking to myself why don’t people do this more often. Whether its building awareness or making decisions easier branding is key. I think you did a great job with this list.

23 Michael Markovits December 23, 2009 at 12:10 pm

I read it and it falls in its place.

Mike

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